Thank you everybody. Our campaign is now over.
Support Richard while he recovers from surgery!
$4,790 raised
68% of $7k goal
43 contributors
0 days left
Ended Dec 31, 2013
Richard is one of the kindest people in this world. He is also funny, witty, brave, positive, generous, a great writer, and would never want to bother anyone with his problems. Most people wouldn't even know he is sick. But he is and needs his ...

Richard is one of the kindest people in this world. He is also funny, witty, brave, positive, generous, a great writer, and would never want to bother anyone with his problems. Most people wouldn't even know he is sick. But he is and needs his friends and family's support through this hard time.

Richard has recently been told he needs a liver transplant. We wanted to do something for him and his new wife to help with all of the many costs associated with the transplant. Richard is unable to go to work and may have to wait years for a liver. Here is his story:

"My liver is rapidly spiraling towards failure, and I need a transplant.

Some back-history:

I've had liver disease (specifically PSC (Primary Sclorosing Chonangitis)) since I was 16. Just before that, I had a massive blood clot in my right leg, for which I still take blood thinners, but that's not relevant at present. For several years, before it settled down, this was a somewhat painful affair physically, and difficult mentally, as PSC is progressive---it gets worse, and there is no cure. That's heavy stuff for a teenager/very young adult, and the struggle with the idea never fully went away, hanging around like a vague sort of doomsday clock.

But the next 7 or so years were, largely, fine. No symptoms of liver disease. Until this summer, where that's gone to hell in a jiffy. PSC normally takes years to develop to the point where a liver transplant is needed, but mine is the rarer type that once it gets going, goes quickly. Starting in June or so, this summer has had a dizzying variety of different pains and challenges, and saw my first time having jaundice. Which, for me, was really hard at first, to look into the mirror and see my very eyes be so different. When it was clear this might be a long-ish term thing that could prevent me working for some time, we asked if we could stay with my dad and stepmom, who welcomed us and have helped tremendously.

The news eventually came, from the nicest, most wonderful doctors in London, that I did need a transplant. I was put through the tests, given a priority score, and put on the list in late October. If you're reading this and sort of freaking out: take heart that if you know me now, you'll probably still know me in two years; it's quite likely that I'll get a transplant, and quite likely I'd survive one. That's not to say I'm not terrified: I am. It's awful stuff. But the statistics are on my side, at least.

But I feel like just saying all this skips aside the meat of it, I don't want clichés about how I'll make it through; I just want to let people know where I'm at. And, largely, where I'm at is a very difficult time; the past month and a half have been especially a challenge, with moments of less pain more than balanced out by so many helpless hours of wishing I could fast forward time; could sleep better; could hug people without fear of them accidentally hurting my protruding liver; could walk at normal speed; could be usual self, especially with Cassan (My Wife), who sees me at my most pained; could ride in cars without quiet agony; could simply have a bit of peace. It has been, in a word, rough. But I've also had so much kindness, generosity and help from those close to me, and even those I haven't seen in a long time, that I am continuously grateful and still in love with the world. I don't feel bitter in the least, or that I have been slighted by some cosmic hand; just unlucky.

I don't know for sure that things will get better, but they probably will, eventually. In the meantime, there is a lot to struggle through, and I appreciate all kind thoughts and well-wishes, spoken or unspoken. And of course, immense thanks to those closest to me, particularly Cassan, who have helped me in too many ways to name.

Much love."

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