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$385 raised
77% of $500 goal
8 contributors
4 Years running
As some of you already know, I am going to the Dominican Republic with a team of various medical professionals in an effort to provide healthcare to impoverished communities. My group and I are trying to raise funds to purchase medical supplies and ...
As some of you already know, I am going to the Dominican Republic with a team of various medical professionals in an effort to provide healthcare to impoverished communities. My group and I are trying to raise funds to purchase medical supplies and personal hygiene supplies for the families we will caring for. Any amount you donate will be greatly appreciated. A little bit goes a long way! If you are unable to donate money but have spare (new and unopened) supplies you would like to donate please message me and I will make arrangements to pick them up from you. Some items that we are still in need of include: toothbrushes, soap, shampoo, conditioner, children's chewable vitamins (not gummies), multi-vitamins, washcloths, and of course goodies (candies, flip-flops, crayons, etc) for the children are welcome as well.

Below is some information about the communities we will be visiting. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me! Thank you so much for taking the time to read this!

"Every year for seventy years or more, male seasonal immigrants from Haiti have arrived to work the sugar harvest in the Dominican Republic... Over time, some of these migrants have stayed through the six months that follow the cane harvest... and have started families with Haitian women that have migrated as well. ..Bateys are unique in culture and language in their mix of which is Haitian and... Dominican.

The Dominican government has historically provided fewer public services to bateys than to similarly sized communities in the rest of the country. The bateys were regarded as exceptions to the country's governance system. It was often left to the State Sugar Council (CEA: Consejo Estatal de Azúcar) or private companies to provide basic services, a responsibility that all too often they did not fulfill. Bateys were often still regarded as places where only Haitians (non-citizens) live...

Since the Haitians who originally filled the bateys were not legal immigrants, their children have often been denied citizenship papers because they are in transit. Without citizenship papers from Haiti, these children of Haitian immigrants cannot go to school nor can they receive the benefits of other public services; however, a number of non-governmental organizations have attempted to address this problem by operating primary schools on bateys trying to get them Dominican citizenship...

In the past, sugar was a profitable industry. However, the Dominican sugar industry is no longer competitive, and when combined with the historical lack of educational and health services to these communities, the low wages have tended to make bateys some of the poorest communities in the country.The current trend in the Dominican Republic is for the ingenios to stop production, and thus the only source of income for the community and for the bateys to very slowly transform themselves into new sorts of communities..."
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